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Between the end of the 4th round and beginning of the 7th, there are several wide receivers that should give you a solid floor in PPR leagues simply because of sheer volume. They should average about 5-6 catches per game, along with yardage and an occasional TD to account for that solid floor as a primary piece of your weekly lineup. These guy will create a foundation to help you hedge with those high-ceiling and possibly low-floor players at other positions. Demaryius Thomas and Keenan Allen are the stalwarts in this category, which is why they’re being drafted in the third round.  Grabbing one of the following high-volume WRs in these middle rounds will be a benefit on your team to create some stability.

Jarvis Landry

Jarvis Landry is one of the best slot receivers in the NFL, but he makes me a bit nervous this year for a couple of reasons. The first reason is the change at quarterback. Jay Cutler is a guy who likes to target the outside WRs, take downfield shots, and target his tight ends and running backs. We knew what Tannehill’s tendencies were and we had a huge sample size of him targeting Landry 10+ times per game. I’m a believer in the cream rising to the top, and I still think Landry will get decent passing volume in this offense, but he won’t get what we’re used to getting out of him. The other reason is that this team is now a run-first team. From Weeks 1 through 4, Landry averaged 11 targets per game and the Dolphins were 1-3, with their only win against the Browns in Week 3. Week 5 was when they decided to become run-heavy with Jay Ajayi. Starting Week 5, Ajayi had 25 carries to Landry’s 3 targets. The overall passing volume came way down. From then on, Landry averaged 7 targets and 5 receptions per game.

Golden Tate

Golden Tate is a great player, but he’s not a consistent one, and not someone who I would depend on having a high floor. He’s actually more of a high-ceiling play. On a weekly basis, if he wasn’t a WR1 (top 12), he was a WR4 (37th-48th) or worse last year. He finished in the top-5 in 25% of his games, but was a WR4 or worse 56% of the time. He’s not a guy I can depend on being reliable. However, his overall numbers would improve because of the first few weeks of last season. We all remember Marvin Jones owned that field the first few weeks of the season, which were the worst weeks of Tate’s season. If Tate gets it going from the beginning of the season and can produce on a more consistent basis, I wouldn’t mind putting him out there every week.

Larry Fitzgerald

Larry Fitzgerald led the league in receptions last year, and was a solid PPR play, until he slowed down towards the end of the year. As a matter of fact, he did that the past two years. From Weeks 1-9 last year, Fitzgerald averaged 11 targets and 8 receptions per game, with 5 TDs in the first 5 games. He averaged 7 targets with 6 receptions per game the rest of the year, with only one TD coming in the final game of the season. It was a similar story in 2015, except his dropoff started a bit later in Week 13. Fitzgerald has been doing this forever, and he’s at the age where the second half of the season isn’t as easy to him as the first half. David Johnson is now the focal point of this offense, so we can’t expect that much. However, Fitzgerald is still someone you can plug in your lineup, especially in the beginning of the year and expect solid production. If he starts producing, take the production and sell high.

Julian Edelman

Edelman has been Tom Brady’s favorite target for the last few years. Whoever’s playing this role gets peppered with targets, and it started with Wes Welker. Edelman was targeted on 29% of passes last year and 24% in 2015. That’s a huge target share for one guy. He averaged 10 targets and 6 receptions per game throughout the season, even while starting slow. He really picked it up after Week 9, where he was averaging 13 targets and 7 receptions per game. He was very consistent last year, and finished outside a WR3 only 25% of the time. He averaged 12 targets, 7 receptions, and 114 yards per game in their three playoff games. He’s a go-to for Tom Brady, and I don’t see that changing, even with Brandin Cooks on the field. Cooks will stretch the field, making it even easier for Brady to find guys in the middle of the field and underneath the safeties and linebackers. The quality of his targets will go up even if Edelman has a lower target share. He’s a value at the beginning of the 5th round in PPR leagues.

Stefon Diggs

Stefon Diggs was one of the few bright spots on the Vikings offense last year. He’s a very talented player who averaged 9 targets and 6 receptions per game, and probably would have hit 100 receptions on the season if he didn’t miss 3 games. His 75% catch rate was right at the top of the league for wide receivers, while he did have the most accurate passer last year throwing him the ball. The offense as a whole should take a step forward with Bradford getting a full offseason with the team and the offensive line improving on paper. Diggs is their #1 WR and had a healthy 23% target share. He has improved a lot over the last two years, according to Matt Harmon’s Perception Reception. With an improved offensive line and better running back play, I could see Diggs’ yard per reception going up to improve his yardage numbers. He was a WR1 31% of the time, so he will give you some big weeks, but he disappeared along with the offense at times last year.

Jamison Crowder

Jamison Crowder is a guy a lot of people expect to be a 80-90 catch player this year with the departure of Desean Jackson and Pierre Garcon. He only averaged 4 catches per game last year, and had 3 targets or less in 5 of his games. The reason why he became valuable is because of the touchdown streak he went on in the middle of the season. We assumed he was a PPR guy because of the games he turned it on. He had 7 touchdowns in the first 12 games, but only averaged 5 catches for 64 yards during that time. If you started him the rest of the season, he killed you. He’s a streaky player, and not one that I expect to be reliable week in and week out. Now that the Redskins have Jordan Reed and additional, legit red zone threats in Terrelle Pryor and hopefully Josh Doctson, I don’t see Crowder maintaining those type of touchdown numbers. I also don’t see him becoming a 80-90 catch player in this offense either. Cousins is a guy who likes to spread the ball around, and unless Doctson isn’t ready to start the year, I wouldn’t trust Crowder as anything more than a flex.

Pierre Garcon

Pierre Garcon is the new #1 WR in San Francisco. The 49ers are a team that will be losing this year, and their game scripts will have them passing a bunch in 2nd halves of games to catch up. This role in a Kyle Shanahan offense can produce a ton of receptions. When Garcon played under Shanahan in Washington, he led the league in receptions. Garcon’s quarterback, Brian Hoyer, has done some great things for his #1 wide receiver. He locks on his favorite guy and likes to pepper him with targets, as we’ve seen in 2015 with DeAndre Hopkins. If they gain a rapport, Garcon can be looking like a great high-volume play that you can get at a great value in the early 7th round. He was going in the 9th and 10th round a month ago, but he’s still a good value as a guy who can hold down your team with consistency.

Between the end of the 4th round and beginning of the 7th, there are several wide receivers that should give you a solid floor in PPR leagues simply because of sheer volume. They should average about 5-6 catches per game, along with yardage and an occasional TD to account for that solid floor as a primary piece of your weekly lineup. These guy will create a foundation to help you hedge with those high-ceiling and possibly low-floor players at other positions. Demaryius Thomas and Keenan Allen are the stalwarts in this category, which is why they’re being drafted in the third round.  Grabbing one of the following high-volume WRs in these middle rounds will be a benefit on your team to create some stability.

Jarvis Landry

Jarvis Landry is one of the best slot receivers in the NFL, but he makes me a bit nervous this year for a couple of reasons. The first reason is the change at quarterback. Jay Cutler is a guy who likes to target the outside WRs, take downfield shots, and target his tight ends and running backs. We knew what Tannehill’s tendencies were and we had a huge sample size of him targeting Landry 10+ times per game. I’m a believer in the cream rising to the top, and I still think Landry will get decent passing volume in this offense, but he won’t get what we’re used to getting out of him. The other reason is that this team is now a run-first team. From Weeks 1 through 4, Landry averaged 11 targets per game and the Dolphins were 1-3, with their only win against the Browns in Week 3. Week 5 was when they decided to become run-heavy with Jay Ajayi. Starting Week 5, Ajayi had 25 carries to Landry’s 3 targets. The overall passing volume came way down. From then on, Landry averaged 7 targets and 5 receptions per game.

Golden Tate

Golden Tate is a great player, but he’s not a consistent one, and not someone who I would depend on having a high floor. He’s actually more of a high-ceiling play. On a weekly basis, if he wasn’t a WR1 (top 12), he was a WR4 (37th-48th) or worse last year. He finished in the top-5 in 25% of his games, but was a WR4 or worse 56% of the time. He’s not a guy I can depend on being reliable. However, his overall numbers would improve because of the first few weeks of last season. We all remember Marvin Jones owned that field the first few weeks of the season, which were the worst weeks of Tate’s season. If Tate gets it going from the beginning of the season and can produce on a more consistent basis, I wouldn’t mind putting him out there every week.

Larry Fitzgerald

Larry Fitzgerald led the league in receptions last year, and was a solid PPR play, until he slowed down towards the end of the year. As a matter of fact, he did that the past two years. From Weeks 1-9 last year, Fitzgerald averaged 11 targets and 8 receptions per game, with 5 TDs in the first 5 games. He averaged 7 targets with 6 receptions per game the rest of the year, with only one TD coming in the final game of the season. It was a similar story in 2015, except his dropoff started a bit later in Week 13. Fitzgerald has been doing this forever, and he’s at the age where the second half of the season isn’t as easy to him as the first half. David Johnson is now the focal point of this offense, so we can’t expect that much. However, Fitzgerald is still someone you can plug in your lineup, especially in the beginning of the year and expect solid production. If he starts producing, take the production and sell high.

Julian Edelman

Edelman has been Tom Brady’s favorite target for the last few years. Whoever’s playing this role gets peppered with targets, and it started with Wes Welker. Edelman was targeted on 29% of passes last year and 24% in 2015. That’s a huge target share for one guy. He averaged 10 targets and 6 receptions per game throughout the season, even while starting slow. He really picked it up after Week 9, where he was averaging 13 targets and 7 receptions per game. He was very consistent last year, and finished outside a WR3 only 25% of the time. He averaged 12 targets, 7 receptions, and 114 yards per game in their three playoff games. He’s a go-to for Tom Brady, and I don’t see that changing, even with Brandin Cooks on the field. Cooks will stretch the field, making it even easier for Brady to find guys in the middle of the field and underneath the safeties and linebackers. The quality of his targets will go up even if Edelman has a lower target share. He’s a value at the beginning of the 5th round in PPR leagues.

Stefon Diggs

Stefon Diggs was one of the few bright spots on the Vikings offense last year. He’s a very talented player who averaged 9 targets and 6 receptions per game, and probably would have hit 100 receptions on the season if he didn’t miss 3 games. His 75% catch rate was right at the top of the league for wide receivers, while he did have the most accurate passer last year throwing him the ball. The offense as a whole should take a step forward with Bradford getting a full offseason with the team and the offensive line improving on paper. Diggs is their #1 WR and had a healthy 23% target share. He has improved a lot over the last two years, according to Matt Harmon’s Perception Reception. With an improved offensive line and better running back play, I could see Diggs’ yard per reception going up to improve his yardage numbers. He was a WR1 31% of the time, so he will give you some big weeks, but he disappeared along with the offense at times last year.

Jamison Crowder

Jamison Crowder is a guy a lot of people expect to be a 80-90 catch player this year with the departure of Desean Jackson and Pierre Garcon. He only averaged 4 catches per game last year, and had 3 targets or less in 5 of his games. The reason why he became valuable is because of the touchdown streak he went on in the middle of the season. We assumed he was a PPR guy because of the games he turned it on. He had 7 touchdowns in the first 12 games, but only averaged 5 catches for 64 yards during that time. If you started him the rest of the season, he killed you. He’s a streaky player, and not one that I expect to be reliable week in and week out. Now that the Redskins have Jordan Reed and additional, legit red zone threats in Terrelle Pryor and hopefully Josh Doctson, I don’t see Crowder maintaining those type of touchdown numbers. I also don’t see him becoming a 80-90 catch player in this offense either. Cousins is a guy who likes to spread the ball around, and unless Doctson isn’t ready to start the year, I wouldn’t trust Crowder as anything more than a flex.

Pierre Garcon

Pierre Garcon is the new #1 WR in San Francisco. The 49ers are a team that will be losing this year, and their game scripts will have them passing a bunch in 2nd halves of games to catch up. This role in a Kyle Shanahan offense can produce a ton of receptions. When Garcon played under Shanahan in Washington, he led the league in receptions. Garcon’s quarterback, Brian Hoyer, has done some great things for his #1 wide receiver. He locks on his favorite guy and likes to pepper him with targets, as we’ve seen in 2015 with DeAndre Hopkins. If they gain a rapport, Garcon can be looking like a great high-volume play that you can get at a great value in the early 7th round. He was going in the 9th and 10th round a month ago, but he’s still a good value as a guy who can hold down your team with consistency.